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The Ultimate Fighter Jet Shows Us What It Can Do

Pigs really do fly. At least as far as this is concerned they do. Yet our pigs go by another name. They are more commonly known as F111 fighter jets. Airmen refer to them as pigs because they are durable and stubborn. Even at that though, they served the United States Air Force for a little more than 30 years. They also made a showing with the Royal Australian Air Force for a little more than a decade or so. Why? Keep reading.

Superior Handling Sets the F111 Apart

They are artful to say the least. For all of its mass and stubbornness, the F111 handles pretty well. In fact, if you had your choice, you would probably choose to train with it as a pilot rather than something like a Cessna flight training school. There is certainly more to contend with as far as instrumentation, but flying with a joystick beats Cessna controls any day.

Designed and produced by General Dynamics, the F111 Aardvark served as a strategic bomber, electronic water aircraft and recon plane throughout its lifespan. Its sweep wing design is echoed in the F22 Raptors made by Lockheed Martin, and many of its state of the art technological controls form the 60s are now deemed commonplace.

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However, the most fascinating part of the story is why it was developed in the first place. If you were a true child of the sixties you may not remember it, depending on how activ

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